crane.

In the desert,
I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
Who, squatting upon the ground,
Held his heart in his hands,
And ate of it.
I said, “Is it good, friend?”
“It is bitter–bitter,” he answered;”
But I like it
Because it is bitter,
And because it is my heart.


image: Valentine, was created by visual artist Evi Numen

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world’s deadliest pandemics

a wonderful infographic

via

SFGH 6C Survey

Thanks so much for taking the time to complete the survey!

scientists as rockstars.

Just came across this group — PopTeach.

PopTeach is a scrumptious combination of science / leadership / politics / vogue-esque celebrity status and brilliance — meet the 2011 fellows. Worth a perusal.

“Visible scientific leaders shouldn’t be a rarity,” says Andrew Zolli, executive director of PopTech. His group’s Science and Public Leadership Fellowship takes a creative approach to helping science and technology.

Foster social change: Help scientists not be boring. Or more accurately, help them become public leaders.

the science of door-holding etiquette.

original post: NCBI ROFL: The science of door-holding etiquette..

Etiquette and effort: holding doors for others.

“Etiquette, the customary code of polite behavior among members of a group, provides a means of conveying respect for others, but what is the basis for etiquette’s unwritten rules? Here we show that one form of etiquette, holding a door open for another person, reflects the door holder’s expectation that the person for whom he or she holds the door shares the belief that the total effort expended by the two of them will be less than the summed efforts of the two individuals acting on their own. Our observations extend recent work on effort reduction in motor control to the management of social interactions.”

national book awards finalists announced

. . . and so many scrumptious titles/authors.

Poetry
Nikky Finney — Head Off & Split — Triquarterly/Northwestern Universty
Yusef Komunyakaa — The Chameleon Couch — FSG (swoon!)
Carl Phillips — Double Shadow — FSG
Adrienne Rich — Tonight No Poetry Will Serve — W.W. Norton & Company
Bruce Smith — Devotions — University of Chicago Press

Non Fiction
Deborah Baker — The Convert: A Tale of Exile and Extremism — Graywolf Press
Mary Gabriel — Love and Capital: Karl and Jenny Marx and the Birth of a Revolution — Little, Brown
Stephen Greenblatt — The Swerve: How the World Became Modern — W.W. Norton
Manning Marable — Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention — Viking
Lauren Redniss — Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie, A Tale of Love and Fallout – HarperCollins

Fiction
Andrew Krivak — The Sojourn — Bellevue Literary Press
Téa Obreht — The Tiger’s Wife — Random House
Julie Otsuka — The Buddha in the Attic — Knopf
Edith Pearlman — Binocular Vision —Lookout (beautiful)
Jesmyn Ward —Salvage the Bones — Bloomsbury USA

the finalists were announced October 12th at Literary Arts in Portland. via Oregon Public Broadcasting

Explaining Gender Imbalance Statistics through an Infographic Presentation

JESS3 x Economist: Women’s Economic Opportunity from JESS3 on Vimeo.

In hopes of going beyond the traditionally static, and oftentimes boring, PowerPoint presentation, The Economist tapped JESS3 to help bring an important data set to life through a powerful graphic animation.

Working closing with the Economist Intelligence Unit, which compiled a 150-page report called the Women’s Economic Opportunity Index, our team explored creative direction through multiple styleframes in order to achieve a look that would illuminate crucial information about women’s opportunity across the world.

In combing through data and creating detailed storyboards, this six-minute animation tells the story through data visualization of where women stand in the business world from issues ranging from maternity leave to property rights.

The Economist Intelligence Unit presented the data at the World In 2011 Festival, an event that coincided with the 25th Anniversary of The Economist’s World In… publication. It preceded a panel sponsored by the Washington D.C.-based NGO Vital Voices featuring female entrepreneurs who are changing the way women live and work around the world.

http://jess3.com/womens-economic-opportunity-index/

More US Soldiers Killed Themselves Than Died In Combat In 2010

from Good. original.

For the second year in a row, more American soldiers—both enlisted men and women and veterans—committed suicide than were killed in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Excluding accidents and illness, 462 soldiers died in combat, while 468 committed suicide. A difference of six isn’t vast by any means, but the symbolism is significant and troubling. In 2009, there were 381 suicides by military personnel, a number that also exceeded the number of combat deaths.

Earlier this month, military authorities announced that suicides amongst active-duty soldiers had slowed in 2010, while suicides amongst reservists and people in the National Guard had increased. It was proof, they said, that the frequent psychological screenings active-duty personnel receive were working, and that reservists and guardsmen, who are more removed from the military’s medical bureaucracy, simply need to begin undergoing more health checks. This new data, that American soldiers are now more dangerous to themselves than the insurgents, flies right in the face of any suggestion that things are “working.” Even if something’s working, the system is still very, very broken.

One of the problems hindering the military’s attempt to address soldier suicides is that there’s no real rhyme or reason to what kind of soldier is killing himself. While many suicide victims are indeed afflicted with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder after facing heavy combat in the Middle East, many more have never even been deployed. Of the 112 guardsmen who committed suicide last year, more than half had never even left American soil.

“If you think you know the one thing that causes people to commit suicide, please let us know,” Army Vice Chief of Staff General Peter Chiarelli told the Army Times, “because we don’t know what it is.”

The “science diet”

The “science diet”.

10 others thinks MLK said. sweet. smooth. jay smooth.

“men pity and love each other more deeply than they permit themselves to know.”
[tennessee williams]